Fall 2019

Course Descriptions

Please check SIS online to confirm the following information. Updates can occur at any time and the information here is to be used as a guideline.

Undergraduate students can also register for ARAH 5000 level courses.

Art History

Undergraduate

ARTH 1500 Art and Experience

Taught by: Turner

Where does Art come from? How do we come to know it? Experience! Using John Dewey’s Art as Experience as a theoretical launching point, this class will contextualize the masterpieces of modern art in the Phillips Collection such as Renoir’s Luncheon of the Boating Party, Braque’s Round Table, Pierre Bonnard’s Open Window, Matisse’s Quai St. Michel, Thomas Eakins, Mrs. Van Buren, Georgia O’Keeffe’s Ranchos Church, Jacob Lawrence’s Migration Series, Mark Rothko’s Room, as well as Cezanne’s Bathers and Matisse’s Joy of Life at the Barnes Foundation.

ARTH 1500  The Art of Writing

Taught by: Phillips

Learn about the art of writing in Islamic cultures, from holy books to graffiti! Using examples from al Andalus to Indonesia, the class teaches us how to look at beautiful writing as a key facet of human creativity.

ARTH 1503  Art and Astronomy

Taught by: Ramirez-Weaver

This course traces the development of scientific, political, spiritual, magical, and intellectual technologies of power that have tied individuals to their views and uses for astronomy. Topics include: stars and rule, astronomy, astrology, Ptolemy’s universe, Christian reinterpretation, Arabic or Islamic contributions, alchemy, magic, medicine, Galileo, science fiction, Chesley Bonestell, Remedios Varo, and Sigmar Polke.

ARTH 1505 Art and Money

Taught by: Fordham

This introduction to the history of art examines the relationship of artistic value to economic value from the Italian Renaissance to the present. While not a uniquely Western phenomenon, the commodification of art plays a particularly important role in modern capitalist economies, and it enables us to think about the relationship of Western art to imperialism, post-colonialism, and global markets today.

ARTH 2054  Roman Art and Archaeology

Taught by: Rogers

Following an overview of Etruscan art, the course examines the development of Roman architecture, urbanism, sculpture and painting from the Republic to Constantine. A focus is Rome itself, but other archaeological sites, such as Pompeii, in Italy and throughout the empire are also considered. Themes, such as succession, the achievements of the emperor, the political and social role of art, and the dissolution of classical art, are traced.

ARTH 2056  Aegean Art and Archaeology

Taught by: Dakouri-Hild

Introduction to the art and archaeology of the prehistoric Aegean, from the Early Bronze Age to the end of the Late Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1200 BCE). Notable sites examined include Troy, Knossos, Mycenae, Thebes, Pylos. The course also examines cultural and artistic connections with New Kingdom Egypt and the Late Bronze Age Levant.

ARTH 2251  Italian Renaissance Art

Taught by: Purvis

Studies painting, architecture, and sculpture in Italy from the close of the Middle Ages through the sixteenth century. Focuses on the work of major artists such as Giotto, Donatello, Botticelli, Leonardo, and Michelangelo. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.

ARTH 2281  The Age of Caravaggio, Velázquez, and Bernini

Taught by: Goedde

Studies the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the seventeenth century in Italy, the Low Countries, France, and Spain. Focuses on Caravaggio, Bernini, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Poussin.

ARTH 2471  Art Since 1945

Taught by: Robbins

Surveys art production and theory in the U.S. and Europe since World War II. Relationships between artistic practice and critical theory are stressed in an examination of movements ranging from abstract expressionism to neo-geo.

ARTH 2559  Art and Architecture in Africa

Taught by: Paoletti

Examination of key traditions, artists, and theories of art and architecture in Africa from archaeology to the modern time. Topics will include: rock art, archeology of west African empires, art of African kingdoms, Sudanese adobe architecture, masquerade and performance, art of the reliquary, history of collecting, issues of repatriation.

ARTH 2861  East Asian Art

Taught by: Wong

Introduces the artistic traditions of China, Korea, and Japan, from prehistoric times to the modern era. Surveys major monuments and the fundamental concepts behind their creation, and examines artistic form in relation to society, individuals, technology, and ideas.

ARTH 2871  The Arts of India

Taught by: Ehnbom

The class is an overview of Indian sculpture, architecture, and painting from the Third Millennium BC to the 18th century AD and includes works from Hindu, Buddhist, Jain and Islamic traditions.

ARTH 3051  Greek Vase Painting

Taught by: Smith

Survey of the major styles, techniques, and painters of Greek vases produced in the Archaic and Classical periods (c. 700-350 b.c.). Emphasizes themes of myth and daily life, the relationship of vases to other ancient arts, the legacy of form and decoration in the arts of later periods, such as 18th century England, and comparisons with other cultures, such as the Native American southwest. Prerequisite: any course in Art History, Anthropology, Classics or History.

ARTH 3559  Art and Propaganda

Taught by: Schroeder

Is there a difference between art and propaganda? How and why has art been employed as a means to assert control and resist authority around the globe? In what ways does art shape our understandings of history and cultural/racial/ethnic categories? The discipline of art history provides us with the tools to discuss these questions and more.

ARTH 3559  East Asian Art, Landscape, and Ecology

Taught by: Wong

This course introduces the concepts on nature in East Asian traditions-Daoism, Shinto, Buddhism, Confucianism, their impacts on the relationship between human and their natural environment, and the art forms in which the theme of nature predominates, from landscape paintings to religious and garden architecture. It also explores how these ideas can contribute to the modern discourse on environmental ethics.

ARTH 3591  Selfie: The Self-Protrait in Photography

Taught by: Raymond

This Colloquium course, which fulfills the second writing requirement, explores the “selfie” by examining the history of the self-portrait as such, the history of the self-portrait in photography, and by interpreting theories of identity, that lead to the emergence of the selfie as a massively popular trope of social media. The reading load for the course is heavy, engaging theories of identity, history of portraiture, as well as, of course, examining the use and parameters of the selfie. Photographers considered in the course range from those working in the tradition of the self-portrait to contemporary artists deploying the selfie as mode with Instagram as frame.

ARTH 3591  Ottoman Istanbul

Taught by: Phillips

Ottoman Constantinople was one of the most populous cities in Europe. This course looks at its material culture, with attention to how individuals shaped their surroundings, using objects like Chinese and Ottoman porcelains, Florentine silks, Venetian mirrors, and carpets from Iran. We will also consider the ways in which the Sultans tried to impose order on the goods that flowed in and out of the city, with sumptuary law and craft regulation.

ARTH 3591  Jacob Lawrence

Taught by: Turner

Explores the life and art of Jacob Lawrence, particularly his inventions in narrative art on the occasion of the exhibition of twelve panels from his "Struggle: From the History of the American People." There will be a field trip in order to permit access to thirty panels of Lawrence's "Migration Series."

ARTH 3591  Sex and the Ancient City

Taught by: Rogers

This course examines art and architecture in the Mediterranean, in order to explore how sex was conceptualized and understood by ancient Greeks and Romans. Using a variety of art historical and archaeological evidence, from Greek vases to the painted brothels of Pompeii, students will explore a number of themes, including nudity and the body, gender, sexuality, homosexuality, virginity, prostitution, and marriage.

ARTH 3595  Indigenous North American Arts

Taught by: Greci-Green

An introduction to art histories of indigenous North America and of collecting Native arts with close material analysis of objects in the Fralin museum collection.

ARTH 3595  Introduction to Ceramic Analysis

Taught by: Dakouri-Hild

This course will introduce students to applications of digital technologies in the field of archaeology. Class will center around introducing, discussing, and experimenting with digital tools and techniques that are on the cutting edge of archaeological research. Students will learn about a number of topics from the digital humanities, including 3d printing, photogrammetry, and network analysis.

ARTH 3595  Making and Meaning in Renaissance Art

Taught by: Purvis

Explore the materials and techniques used for frescoes, tempera and oil painting, different types of sculptures, architectural materials and building technology, drawing and printmaking as well as well as conceptual themes like cultural meanings associated with materials.

ARTH 4591  The Byzantine City

Taught by: Kondyli

This seminar explores the development of Byzantine cities in relation to Byzantium’s political and socio- economic structures (4th-15th c). It aims at examining cities as lived spaces, investigating their architecture and topography as well as a range of urban experiences from mundane daily deeds to public processions. Byzantine cities are our point of departure but what the seminar is really about is people, people living in Byzantine cities and about how their urban experiences relate to our own. To reconstruct such byzantine urban experiences, we will be creating a digital map of a Byzantine city and designing a series of activities using Virtual Reality applications.

ARTH 4591  From Indian Shrines and Palaces

Taught by: Ehnbom

This class covers the history and the historiography of Indian painting, with primary emphasis on the early development of the Mughal style in the 16thth century and the very beginnings of the schools of Rajasthan.

ARTH 4591  Restitution & Repatriation

Taught by: Fordham

ARTH 4591  Up Close and Personal with the Old Masters

Taught by: Goedde

Working with original works of art in the collections of the Fralin Art Museum, this seminar explores the fundamental issues of the history, connoisseurship, evaluation, and care of prints and drawings from about 1450 to 1850. Each student presents in class four reports on individual drawings or prints. These reports are also revised and submitted as five-to-seven-page research catalogue entries for the Museum curatorial files.

ARTH 4591  Histories of Photography in Africa

Taught by: Paoletti

This course offers an analytical study of selected artists and photographic practices across the African continent from the 1840s to the early 2000s. By considering a wide array of formats and genres—from carte-de-visite to archival interventions, from portraiture to photojournalism—we will address the changing significance of the photographic image across the continent and beyond its borders. We will discuss the relation between photography and other media such as sculpture; interpretations of photography as a tool of surveillance and trigger of emancipation; the tension between vernacular and high art practices. Visits to museums and private collections will help us appreciate these objects’ complex trajectories as they slowly enter major international institutions. Moving beyond binary oppositions such as traditional/modern, authentic/derivative, we will study how these images contribute and shape our global visual economy.

ARTH 4591 Skyscraper!

Taught by: Reilly

Skyscrapers are emblematic of their urban location as well as the companies who built them. A wide range of approaches to the skyscraper will be employed to understand this iconic building type from urban, social, political and economic perspectives. Students will examine these issues as they learn to write a major research paper.

ARTH 4591 Aboriginal Contemporary Art

Taught by: Skerritt

What does it mean to call Aboriginal art “contemporary”? Taking advantage of UVA’s world-class collection of Aboriginal Australian art, this course will introduce students to the key art historical, philosophical and anthropological approaches to Aboriginal art. The seminar will situate Aboriginal art within a global critical context, asking students to consider the specific challenges that the Aboriginal art movement poses to our understanding of contemporary art and culture.

ARTH 4951  University Museums Internship

Taught by: Love & Handler

This is a two-semester sequence of two three-credit courses. Students will do internships (lasting for an academic year) at either the Fralin Museum of Art or the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. As interns, students will work approximately 100 hours each semester (7-8 hours per week) in the museum, under the close supervision of museum professionals, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Space is limited. Application required: to apply please email instructors your transcript, resume, and a one-page essay indicating your interest in museum work and your experience (if any). Deadline May 1st.

ARTH 4998  Undergraduate Thesis Research

Taught by: Various

Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.

Art History

Graduate

ARAH 8051 Theory and Interpretation in the Visual Arts

Taught by: Robbins

Investigates problems in the theory and interpretation of the visual arts.

ARAH 9505  Animals in Ancient Greek Art

Taught by: Smith

There has been a growing interest in the subject of animals in ancient Greece, as attested by the recent publications of Alexandridis (2008), Calder (2012), and Kitchell (2014), and Oxford’s Handbook of Animals in Classical Thought and Life (2014). This interdisciplinary seminar will explore the evidence for wild and domestic animals, both large and small, in ancient Greek art and material culture. Students will be introduced not only to a variety of animals - dogs, cats, and weasels, snakes, bulls, and birds - in a variety of artistic media (e.g. vase-painting, gems, coins, sculpture), but also to when and how the iconography of individual animals originates, develops, and spreads. Using ancient texts (e.g. Homer, Aristophanes, Aesop, Aristotle), the seminar will explore terminology and perceptions of animals, both generally and specifically, as well as the interplay and reliability of different categories and/or genres.

Major themes will include animals in religious life and cult practice (i.e. sacrificial victims, votive figurines), animals and mythology, animals and performance, animals as entertainment, human-animal / animal-animal interaction, and animals in the archaeological record. Where relevant, comparisons with other Mediterranean cultures (e.g. Cypriot, Etruscan) will be incorporated. Although readings for the seminar will cover the entirety of ancient Greek art from Prehistoric through Hellenistic times, the primary focus of visual examples and material evidence will be the 7th-4th centuries BC. Students with an interest in Late Antiquity, including Judaism and Christianity, may be given additional readings and guidance.

ARAH 9515  Technologies of the Sacred

Taught by: Ramirez-Weaver

From the cult of relics to hermetic practice multiple methods were honed and exercised in order to perfect the natural realm, heal the sick, touch the dead, tap their power, and ultimately in western Christian Europe to bring about the salvation of humankind and the renewal of the earth.

ARAH 9535 Gray Zones: Artmaking in 18th/19th Century Europe

Taught by: Betzer

Taking off from ancient and Renaissance articulations, this seminar explores what has been imagined to constitute the separate arenas of painting, and sculpture. Our interest will be in art practices that necessarily brokered an interaction between these modes, including bas relief sculpture, grisaille painting, polychrome sculpture, and intaglio printing.

Studio Art

ARTS 2000 Introduction to Studio Art

An introductory course, divided into three segments, which serves as a prerequisite to all studio courses. In Drawing students will learn observational drawing and how visual thinking connects with the hand. The Conceptual segment will exercise creative problem-solving skills and teach students to engage in critical discourse. The Digital segment teaches basic technical skills and digital tools including still and moving image and sound.

ARTS 2110 Introduction to Photography I

Focuses on gaining a working understanding of black and white photo processes and, most importantly, opening up a dialogue about photography. Class assignments help students understand the visual language of photography using 35mm film and printing in the darkroom. In addition, lectures explore examples from the historical and contemporary worlds of fine art photography and readings range from art and philosophy to science. Prereq: ARTS 2000

ARTS 2112 - Introduction to Photography II

Building off of 2110, this course offers an introduction to color photography, digital printing methods, and medium format cameras. Advanced skills are demonstrated and practiced with the goal of increasing the quality of the work. Further explorations into historical and contemporary art issues via presentations, visiting artists, and readings increase awareness. Students create a final portfolio. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110

ARTS 2220 - Introduction to New Media I

This class introduces digital techniques in the context of fine art. Topics covered include digital imaging and basic interactive art. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000.

ARTS 2370 - Introduction to Cinematography I

The course introduces experimental 16mm film production as a practice of visual art. These courses include technical, historical, and theoretical issues that apply to cinematography and its relationship to the traditional visual arts. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000.

ARTS 2560 - Special Topics in Printmaking

An introduction to the specialized materials, methods, processes, and cultural issues as they relate to the history and practice of Printmaking

ARTS 2570 - Special Topics in Painting

Students are introduced to specialized materials, methods and cultural issues as they relate to painting.

ARTS 2610 - Drawing I

A continued introductory study of the materials and techniques of drawing. Provides training in the coordination of hand and eye and encourages development of visual analysis. Emphasizes understanding form, space, light and composition. May be taken concurrently with ARTS 2000.

ARTS 2620 - Drawing II

Applies technical drawing skills to projects that delve into analytical thinking and idea-based work. Projects are designed to help students experiment and learn how to communicate meaning visually. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000 and ARTS 2610.

ARTS 2670 - Introduction to to Intaglio & Monotype Printmaking

Introduction to basic black and white etching techniques, basic black and white plate lithography, and techniques of stone lithography. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000 and 2610.

ARTS 2672 - Introduction to Lithography & Relief Printmaking

Introduction to Lithography (planographic), and woodcut and other relief printmaking processes. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000 and 2610.

ARTS 2710 - Introduction to Water-Based Painting

Introduction to basic water painting techniques and materials (including acrylic, gouache, and water color), emphasizing perception and color. Assignments are designed to assist the student in understanding the creative process and interpreting the environment through a variety of subject matter expressed in painted images. Encourages individual stylistic development. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000 and 2610.

ARTS 2712 - Introduction to Oil Painting

Introduction to Oil-based painting. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000 and 2610.

ARTS 2810 - Introduction to Sculpture I

Investigates the sculptural process through modeling, carving, fabricating and casting. Examines traditional and contemporary concerns of sculpture by analyzing historical examples and work done in class. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000.

 

ARTS 2812 - Introduction to Sculpture II

Introduction to sculpture techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2000.

ARTS 3110 - Intermediate Photography I

Expands technical possibilities available to students by introducing large format cameras. Class time involves evaluating work in progress, slide presentations (sometimes by students as research projects) or discussion of reading material. Students create a final portfolio from assignments. Cameras provided. Prerequisite: ARTS 2110 and ARTS 2112

ARTS 3220 - Intermediate New Media I

This class continues the investigation of digital art begun in ARTS 2220 and 2222 through the introduction of experimental video history and techniques. Prerequisite: ARTS 2220 and ARTS 2222.

ARTS 3370 - Intermediate Cinematography I

This course continues the practice of 16mm experimental film production with an increased emphasis on audio and digital video motion picture making. Student will complete assignments based on genres of experimental film making such as expressionism, naturalism, and realism. Prerequisite: ARTS 2370 and ARTS 2372.

ARTS 3670 - Intermediate Printmaking I

Includes relief printing, advanced lithography techniques, including color lithography, color etching, monotypes, and further development of black and white imagery. Printmaking professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 2670 and ARTS 2672.

ARTS 3710 - Intermediate Painting I

Exploration of contemporary painting materials, techniques, and concepts, as well as a continuation of basic oil painting processes. Assignments are designed to assist the student in developing their perceptions and imagination and translating them into painted images. Direction is given to the formation of personal original painting styles. Prerequisite: ARTS 2710, 2712.

ARTS 3810 - Intermediate Sculpture I

Continuation of ARTS 2810 and ARTS 2812 with greater emphasis on the special problems of the sculptural discipline. Prerequisite: ARTS 2810, 2812.

ARTS 4110 - Advanced Photography I

Group study designed to assist students in preparing their required thesis exhibitions. Meets twice a week as a group to evaluate and discuss work in progress. (Fall only.) Prerequisite: ARTS 3110 or ARTS 3112.

ARTS 4220 - Advanced New Media I

This class encourages independent development of a semester long project that engages with the discourses and techniques around contemporary new media art. Prerequisite: ARTS 3220 or ARTS 3222.

ARTS 4370 - Advanced Cinematography I

Course continues the practice of 16mm film or digital video experimental production with an emphasis on a completed piece for public screenings or exhibitions. Prerequisite: ARTS 3370 or ARTS 3372.

ARTS 4450 - Distinguished Major Project

Intensive independent work using either sculpture, photography, printmaking, cinematography, or painting as the primary medium, culminating in a coherent body of work under direction of a faculty member. Prerequisite: Admission to the Distinguished Major Program.

ARTS 4670 - Advanced Problems in Printmaking

Designed for students who have completed two or more semesters of study of a specific printmaking technique (woodcut, etching, or lithography) and wish to continue their exploration of that technique. Prerequisite: ARTS 3670 or 3672.

ARTS 4710 - Advanced Painting I

The capstone of a three year study in painting. Continues the investigation of oil painting as an expressive medium and stresses the development of students' ability to conceive and execute a series of thematically related paintings over the course of the semester. Painting professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3710 or 3712.

ARTS 4810 - Advanced Sculpture I

Continuation of the sculpture sequence with greater emphasis on developing a student's individual voice. Advanced projects in moldmaking, metal casting, and non-traditional sculpture materials are assigned. The creation of a sculptural installation is also assigned. Sculpture professors and course content vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: ARTS 3810 or 3812.

ARTS 4900 - Advanced Project in Art

Investigation and development of a consistent idea or theme in painting, sculpture, or the graphic arts. May be taken more than once under the same course number by students who are sufficiently advanced in studio work. This course is not intended to be used for major credit. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.

Arts Administration

ARAD 3100  Principles and Practices of Arts Administration

Taught by: George Sampson

Introductory survey of principles and practices of arts administration, as the crossroads of art and audience.

ARAD 4050 Arts Marketing Theory and Practice

Taught by: Garland

Audience development theory and marketing strategies and techniques as they apply specifically to the arts and arts institutions.

ARAD 4500 Introduction to Design Thinking

Taught by: George Sampson

This course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques.

Spring 2019

Course Descriptions

Please check the Online COD to confirm the following information. Updates can occur at any time and the information here is to be used as a guideline.

Undergraduate students can also register for arah 5000 level courses.

Arts Administration

ARAD 1550 Topics in Arts Administration

Taught by: George Sampson

This course provide students interested in principles of the contemporary art world with first-hand accounts of the market and industry from a wide range of professionals. It focuses specifically on trends in the visual arts market with a particular emphasis on contemporary art through sales in auction houses and galleries, as well as its genesis from living artists and its preservation in the homes of collectors and halls of fine art museums.

ARAD 3550 Ecology of the Local Arts

Taught by: George Sampson

Each Arts in Context course is a multi-layered look at the Arts – both visual and performing – within multiple contexts in our society. This class will look at the local arts scene of both Grounds and in the Community. 

ARAD 4200 Development and Board Management

Taught by: George Sampson

This course explores techniques and rationales behind the giving and the raising of funds; and the closely related skills of leading and managing trustees, boards and volunteers. The course will examine these fields using both theory and practical applications. Both in-class discussions and distinguished guest speakers will be utilized.

Art History

ARTH 1500 Painting and Prose

Taught by: Douglas Fordham

Somebody once said, “Ut pictura poesis,” or, “Poetry is a speaking picture, painting a silent poetry.” But what does that mean, exactly, and how does it work? Humans have told stories about famous paintings, and painted famous stories, all in the attempt to figure out ourselves and our world. Co-taught by Art History and English professors, this course explores the relationships between key masterpieces of painting and prose. 

ARTH 1505 Arts and Popular Culture

Taught by: Carmenita Higginbotham

The course examines the role of popular culture in art and art history. Within shifting conceptions of “popular”, we will interrogate how issues such as media, art collecting, technology and social, historical, and politcal shifts have informed the production of visual culture and art practice from the 16th century to the present. 

ARTH 1505 Art and Indigenous Peoples

Taught by: Prof. Skerritt

Over the past three decades, Indigenous people have increasingly asserted themselves in the political, social and artistic domains. Rather than disappearing in the face of colonial oppression, Indigenous cultures today are as strong and diverse as ever. Art has been a central tool in the processes of cultural revitalization and the struggle for Indigenous rights. This course explores the role that art plays in contemporary Indigenous cultures, as well as the ways in which Indigenous artists have strategically used the art world to assert their identities in the modern world. Using the world-class holdings of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection and the Fralin Museum of Art, it will use an object-based approach to consider the global significance of Indigenous art to our understanding of the world today. 

ARTH 2052 Ancient Egypt

Taught by: Anastasia Dakouri-Hild

Survey of Egyptian art and architecture (Predynastic-New Kingdom, 4000-1100 BC). The course introduces students to the great monuments and works of art, and to the beliefs that engendered them. While the focus is on pharaonic 'visual' culture, neglected 'others' (women, cross-gendered persons, foreigners, commoners) and their material/visual cultures are brought to attention to provide a nuanced understanding of Egyptian society and culture. 

ARTH 2054 Roman Art and Archaeology

Taught by: Prof. Miliaresis

Following an overview of Etruscan art, the course examines the development of Roman architecture, urbanism, sculpture and painting from the Republic to Constantine. A focus is Rome itself, but other archaeological sites, such as Pompeii, in Italy and throughout the empire are also considered. Themes, such as succession, the achievements of the emperor, the political and social role of art, and the dissolution of classical art, are traced.

ARTH 2252 High Renaissance and Mannerist Art

Taught by: Prof. Purvis

Studies the painting, architecture, and sculpture or the sixteenth century, emphasizing the works of major artists, such as Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael, Giorgione, and Titian. Detailed discussion of the social, political, and cultural background of the arts.

ARTH 2282 The Age of Rubens and Rembrandt: Baroque Art in the Netherlands

Taught by: Lawrence O. Goedde

A survey of the art of the Dutch and Flemish Golden Age, including such artists as Rubens, Rembrandt, van Dyck, Hals and Vermeer. The course examines innovations in style and new subjects like landscape, still life and daily-life genre in relation to major historical developments, including the revolt of the Netherlands, the rise of the Dutch Republic, and the Counter-Reformation. The course includes a survey of Dutch architecture.

ARTH 2371 Impressionism and Post Impressionism

Taught by: Prof. Stone

Surveys modernist movements in European art during the second half of the nineteenth century. Major themes include the establishment of modernity as a cultural ideal, the development of the avant-garde, and the genesis of the concept of abstraction.

ARTH 2491 The History of Photography

Taught by: Claire Raymond

General survey of the photographic medium from 1839 to the present. Emphasizes the technical, aesthetic, and critical issues particular to the medium.

ARTH 2559 African Art

Taught by: Giulia Paoletti

This course examines Africa's chief forms of visual art from prehistoric times to the present.

ARTH 2862 Arts of the Buddhist World - India to Japan

Taught by: Daniel Ehnbom

Surveys the Buddhist sculpture, architecture and painting of India, China and Japan. Considers aspects of history and religious doctrine.

ARTH 2961 Arts of the Islamic World

Taught by: Amanda Phillips

The class is an overview of art made in the service of Islam in the Central Islamic Lands, Egypt, North Africa, Spain, Turkey, Iran, Central Asia, and South and Southeast Asia.

ARTH 3559/ITTR 3559 Michelangelo and His World

Taught by: Prof. Parker

Michelangelo’s name conjures genius and a nearly superhuman achievement in the arts. Contemporaries elevated him as the supreme sculptor, painter and architect of the age. His work offers a window on a deeply personal vision and rich artistic culture. Michelangelo’s creativity extends to many media—sculpture, painting, architecture, and writing in poetry and prose. This course focuses on all these pursuits. The course is not only about the extraordinary achievements of this Renaissance luminary but the ways in which we can analyze and compare visual and written works. To this end we will examine closely the artist’s poems and letters, contemporary assessments of his artistic achievements, and critical articles on his work. This course is intended to enhance students’ skills in analyzing visual and literary artefacts. This skill is crucial in our media age which relies increasingly on visual messages and the interplay of text and image.

ARTH 3559/ENAM 3559 Native American Literatures

Taught by: Prof. Wood

What is American Indian/Native American literature? In this course we will examine that question, focusing primarily on what has been called the “Native American Literary Renaissance,” which began in the late 1960s and continues today.

ARTH 3591 Pagans and Christians

Taughty by: Fotini Kondyli

This seminar explores the interaction between pagans and Christians in the Late Roman Empire (2nd- 6th c AD). We will study both pagan and Christian monuments and examine their role in the transformation of Late Roman cities, and in shifting sacred topographies. We will also focus on Christian attitudes towards pagan monuments to explore the impact of pagan art and architecture in the making of Christian masterpieces.

ARTH 3591 Photography and the Uncanny

Taught by: Claire Raymond

Photography from its inception has been an uncanny art: every photograph is a “double” of the object scene it pictures. This course plumbs the depths of photography’s uncanniness. We study the origins of the photographic negative, the Gothic, the optical uncanny, the Surreal, and evocations of the uncanny in twenty-first century Indigenous photography. The course draws extensively on aesthetic theory and meets the second writing requirement.

ARTH 3591 Conflict in Ancient Cultures

Taught by: Prof. Tennant

This course will focus on material and artistic evidence for conflict (military, political, cultural, etc.) in the Greco-Roman world.

ARTH 3591 Alexander Calder and the World of Modern Art

Taught by: Elizabeth Hutton Turner

This lecture class will explore the professional and social context for one of the most successful modern sculptors in the twentieth century.

ARTH 3595/ANTH 3590 Indigenous North American Arts

Taught by: Prof. Greci-Green

An introduction to art histories of indigenous North America and of collecting Native arts with close material analysis of objects in the Fralin museum collection.

ARTH 3861 Chinese Art

Taught by: Dorothy Wong

The course is a survey of the major epochs of Chinese art from pre-historic to the modern period. The course intends to familiarize students with the important artistic traditions developed in China: ceramics, bronzes, funerary art and ritual, Buddhist art, painting, and garden architecture. It seeks to understand artistic form in relation to technology, political and religious beliefs, and social and historical contexts, with focus on the role of the state or individuals as patrons of the arts. It also introduces the major philosophic and religious traditions (Confucianism, Daoism, and Buddhism) that have shaped cultural and aesthetic ideals, Chinese art theories, and the writings of leading scholars.

ARTH 4051 Art History: Theory and Practice

Taught by: Eric Ramírez-Weaver and Prof. Stylianopoulos

This course introduces art history majors to the basic tools and methods of art historical research, and to the theoretical and historical questions of art historical interpretation. The course will survey a number of current approaches to the explanation and interpretation of works of art, and briefly address the history of art history. Prerequisite: Major or minor in art history.

ARTH 4591 Politics of the Past

Taught by: Anastasia Dakouri-Hild

The seminar focuses on the cultural politics involving antiquities with a variety of issues illuminated: nationalism and archaeology in the service of the state; sanctimony and stewardship of ancient sites; repatriation and restitution of art; the commodification of culture in contemporary society; art/artifacts as spoils of war; the ethics of connoisseurship and collecting; social and economic aspects of illicit antiquities trade etc. 

ARTH 4591 Looking at, Talking about, and Writing about Art

Taught by: John J. Dobbins

This seminar is all about Looking, Talking, and Writing, and these critical activities are focused on art, architecture and urbanism.  The goal is to enhance your skills in these three important areas (looking, talking, writing) because the ability to look carefully, speak coherently, and write effectively will serve you for a lifetime.  Moreover, these are transferable skills.  This course focuses on art, architecture and urbanism, but the skills in the title can be applied to forensic evidence, the law, diagnostic evidence in medicine, etc. Note that the goal of the seminar is the enhancement of certain skills.  The ultimate goal is the looking, talking, writing.  The course content is the means to get us there. The result of looking closely is that we will examine in depth aspects of art, architecture and urbanism.

ARTH 4591 Strategies of Interpretation II Highland

Taught by: Lisa Reilly and Prof. Cleckley

What would you do if you could re-imagine interpretation at a historic site? James Monroe’s Highland (http://highland.org) has the opportunity to answer this exact question as it plans and creates new exhibits that incorporate its recent research discoveries that were reported in the Washington Post and elsewhere.

ARTH 4591 Painting from Indian Shrines & Palaces

Taught by: Daniel Ehnbom

This class covers the history and the historiography of Indian painting, with primary emphasis on the early development of the Mughal style in the 16th century and the very beginnings of the schools of Rajasthan.

ARTH 4591 Hogarth's London

Taught by: Douglas Fordham

This seminar examines the artistic career of William Hogarth and his contribution to the cultural geography of London in the eighteenth century as Britain’s capital became the largest city in Europe. Major themes include the relation of fine art to popular culture, the politics of cultural space, the rise of print culture and caricature, and the place of art in the public sphere.

ARTH 4591 Prints and Drawings

Taught by: Lawrence Goedde

This seminar uses the collections of the Fralin Art Museum to explore fundamental issues of the history, connoisseurship, and care of prints and drawings. Each student researches four specific drawings or prints, which are presented as class reports and then submitted as five-to-seven-page essays.

ARTH 4500 Did Aboriginal Artists Invent Contemporary Art?

This course introduces the use of abductive reasoning to solve complex problems, using Architecture and the Arts as exemplars of creative problem solving techniques. 

ARTH 4591/ANTH 4590 Introduction to Design Thinking

Taught by: Prof. Skerritt

What does it mean to call Aboriginal art “contemporary”? Taking advantage of UVA’s world-class collection of Aboriginal Australian art, this course will introduce students to the key art historical, philosophical and anthropological approaches to Aboriginal art. The seminar will situate Aboriginal art within a global critical context, asking students to consider the specific challenges that the Aboriginal art movement poses to our understanding of contemporary art and culture. Students will have the opportunity to test these ideas through direct engagement with the collections of the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection at UVA.

ARTH 4591 Jacob Lawrence & American Modernisms

Taught by: Elizabeth Hutton Turner

Explores the life and art of Jacob Lawrence, particularly his inventions in narrative art.

ARTH 4591 Patronage and Gift-Giving in Byzantium

Taught by: Fotini Kondyli

This seminar explores the people behind iconic Byzantine masterpieces. What did the Byzantines hope to achieve with acts of patronage and gift-giving? Were these acts of piety or of self-promotion? We look at different types of patrons, from the Imperial family and elites to ordinary people, and consider how their personalities and social aspirations influenced some of the greatest Byzantine artworks. 

ARTH 4591 Castles and Cathedrals of the High Middle Ages

Taught by: Melissa Jordan Love

Castles and Cathedrals are some of the most sought-after sites for visitors to modern-day Europe. However, certain of these monuments were pivotal in the advancement of building technology and new aesthetic design ideas. We will examine these structures and see how they exemplify changes in cultural and technological exchange in Europe in the period between 1050-1350.

ARTH 4591/ARH 4591 Museum Interpretation: Highland

Taught by: Prof. Cleckey and Lisa Reilly

What happens when a museum learns it must rewrite its history? Just this has occurred at the house museum, Highland, where archaeology has recently transformed our understanding of this site. Our seminar will use Highland as a case study for exploring how museums create and present their narratives. Through a series of field trips to local museums we will explore the current possibilities for museum interpretation as well as consider new ones.

ARTH 4951 University Museums Internship

Taught by: Melissa Jordan Love and Prof. Handler

This is a two-semester sequence of two three-credit courses. Students will do internships (lasting for an academic year) at either the Fralin Museum of Art or the Kluge-Ruhe Aboriginal Art Collection. As interns, students will work approximately 100 hours each semester (7-8 hours per week) in the museum, under the close supervision of museum professionals, and will participate in three training sessions and three academic seminars. Space is limited. Application required: to apply please email instructors your transcript, resume, and a one-page essay indicating your interest in museum work and your experience (if any). Deadline May 1st.

ARTH 4998 Undergraduate Thesis Research

Research for a thesis of approximately 50 written pages undertaken in the fall semester of the fourth year by art history majors who have been accepted into the department's Distinguished Majors Program.