Graduate Students

Dove

Sun, 2019-08-11 21:24 -- Jieru

Emma Langham Dove is a first-year doctoral student studying medieval art history with Dr. Eric Ramirez-Weaver. She received her Master of Arts in Religion from Yale Divinity School and the Institute of Sacred Music in 2017, and graduated with honors from Harvard University in 2014. She is particularly interested in medieval material culture and the role of the illuminated book of hours in late medieval society.  

Doe Stone

Sun, 2019-08-11 21:15 -- Jieru

Elizabeth graduated magna cum laude with high honors from Dartmouth College, where she received the William B. Jaffe Award for Excellence in Art History and completed her honors thesis on John Singer Sargent's early figural painting. Elizabeth is currently a doctoral candidate studying late nineteenth-century European and American painting under the direction of Sarah Betzer.

Caticha

Sun, 2019-08-11 21:05 -- Jieru

Alicia is a doctoral candidate studying eighteenth- and nineteenth-century European art and material culture with Professor Sarah Betzer. Her dissertation, "The Matter of Sculpture: Étienne-Maurice Falconet: Marble, Porcelain, and Sugar in Eighteenth-Century Paris," poses the Academic sculptor as a nexus between Enlightenment aesthetic theory and the mass-production of sculpture during the burgeoning consumer culture of the 1760s.

Bradford

Sun, 2019-08-11 20:58 -- Jieru

Abigail Bradford is a second year PhD student in the Program in Mediterranean Art and Archaeology studying under Dr.

Boulden

Sun, 2019-08-11 20:52 -- Jieru

Ashley is a fourth-year doctoral candidate studying eighteenth-century French prints and drawings. She received a Bachelor of Arts in Art History and French from Wellesley College in 2009, where her senior honors thesis “A Converging of Styles: The Davis Museum’s Album of 138 Ornament Prints” won the Plogsterth Prize in Art History. She received a Master of Studies in History of Art from the University of Oxford in 2011.

Arroyo

Sun, 2019-08-11 20:50 -- Jieru

Nenette studies the architecture, devotional art, and ritual objects of the Spanish California missions with an eye to capturing the sensory and performative aspects of religious conversion within a colonial context. Her dissertation aims to situate this period in American history within a global tradition of creating sacred spaces as sites of constructed meanings and negotiated identities. Professor Richard Guy Wilson directs her project.

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